Date Oct 27, 2021 User 胡锡进 Rating Explicit Score 65
Why this post was flagged for deletion ?
 
They even censored the nipples?? LoL.
 
Date Jan 12 User qwqw3182202 Rating Questionable Score 105
Where can i find the pictures from RJ296679 too?
 
Date Jan 12 User Dreista Rating Questionable Score 30
damn, this is erotic in another way
 
She looks a little more like a Disney character here.
 
Date Aug 13, 2006 User cyanoacry Rating Safe Score 80 Hidden 73
Didn't know this site was this old.
Glad yande.re is still going. Stable, trustworthy, and no ads or clickbait, I don't know how you stay up.
Created mine in 2010, Still have this as my home page :)
So this was the first ever post?

Best site ever
Olkon said:
So this was the first ever post?

Best site ever
The third, actually. But this is the oldest. I guess the two firsts were just for test, or were deleted.
 
Can anyone aprove/delete this? It's been over 2 months.
There were plenty of missing tags. I added them.
8mine8 said:
Can anyone aprove/delete this? It's been over 2 months.
Looks like it's got approved now, but it's suggested to get a version with larger dimensions, as this one is too small for a scanned book even though it's allowed for physically scanned images to have pixels less than 1.6 million (that's mainly for small things like telephone cards).
Thanks for the approval and sorry for not adding the tags.

For the quality of the scan, this was the best I could find. It's from an old magazine, I don't think there is a bigger scan.
8mine8 said:
Thanks for the approval and sorry for not adding the tags.

For the quality of the scan, this was the best I could find. It's from an old magazine, I don't think there is a bigger scan.
I see. Then I believe it's OK to keep this one here for now.
Whoever does the low-res post evaluation, it clearly wasn't his first priority in the past couple of months.
 
Date Jan 3 User hiroimo2 Rating Safe Score 87 Hidden 3
@Thorcsf: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_calendar :
Days begin and end at midnight, and months begin on the day of the new moon. Years start on the second (or third) new moon after the winter solstice. Solar terms govern the beginning and end of each month. A sexagenary cycle consists of stems (干, ‘’gān’’) and branches (支, ‘’zhī‘’) is used as identification alongside each year and month; including intercalary months or leap months. The length of a month is also annotated as either long (大, literally “big” for months with 30 days) or short (小, literally “small” for months with 29 days).
In other words: to put it simple (from observing the resulting effects), you still get 12 months each year in general in the Chinese Calendar, but with less days each month compared with the Georgian Calendar. So, when the Chinese New Year's day got "pushed" too early (towards the New Year's Day of the Georgian Calendar), you usually get a leap month inserted somewhere during that Chinese Calendar year, "pulling back" the New Year's day of the next Chinese year.
Thanks, but too complicated to understand. :P
So you mean that the Chinese New Year's day is not always the same every year (in accordance to the Gregorian calendar)? I also didn't understand much about that leap month; if the Chinese calendar has 10 days less than the Gregorian calendar, how could they add a "leap month" if every Chinese month has 29 or 30 days? That'd be too much to skip. And what about the four seasons that I asked? Does the Chinese calendar can keep them aligned with with each year's period and duration with that leap month thing? Because, as I said, the four seasons last exactly 365 days and 6 hours (and, as you probably know, they add an additional day in February every four years to compensate for that additional 6 hours of every year), but the Chinese calendar is shorter.

Years start on the second (or third) new moon after the winter solstice.
And why is that? Why second or third?
Thorcsf said:
Thanks, but too complicated to understand. :P
So you mean that the Chinese New Year's day are not always the same every year (in accordance to the Gregorian calendar)?
Correct, as they are different calendar systems.
Thorcsf said:
I also didn't understand much about that leap month; if the Chinese calendar has 10 days less than the Gregorian calendar, how could they add a "leap month" if every Chinese month has 29 or 30 days? That'd be too much to skip.
The leap month isn't inserted to every Chinese calendar year - what I observed is, when the current Chinese New Year's Day falls into January, one would expect there's going to be a leap month somewhere during this year, and so the New Year's Days of the next few years will be kept in February (i.e. no leap month for those years).

As for the method of calculating the insertion of a leap month - sorry but I have zero knowledge about that.

Update: Not sure if this section (and maybe the rest) of the article explains what you tried to ask: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intercalation_(timekeeping)#Lunisolar_calendars

Thorcsf said:
And what about the four seasons that I asked? Does the Chinese calendar can keep them aligned with with each year's period and duration with that leap month thing? Because, as I said, the four seasons last exactly 365 days and 6 hours (and, as you probably know, they add an additional day in February every four years to compensate for that additional 6 hours of every year), but the Chinese calendar is shorter.
No worries, as there's something called "solar term" in the system (that's why the system is a lunisolar calendar as mentioned in the Chinese calendar link)
Thorcsf said:
And why is that? Why second or third?
The same article has actually explained it (in the "Chinese New Year" section): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_calendar#Chinese_New_Year
And if you want the dates for the current and 11 next years and signs, they are here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_New_Year#Dates_in_Chinese_lunisolar_calendar
moonian said:
Thank you very much for the extensive explanation and your efforts to search/gather all that information. You've covered all of my queries and I think I've got the grasp of everything now, although it's a complicated calendar system. :P

There's only one thing that I didn't quite understand yet. By what I read there on Wikipedia, when a leap month is inserted, they apparently repeat one month in the year; but each month in the Chinese calendar has 29 or 30 days. A leap month can't be this long, right? It'd be too much to add in the year. What is the duration of a leap month exactly? I didn't see that information. Does it vary by year?

Trit said:
And if you want the dates for the current and 11 next years and signs, they are here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_New_Year#Dates_in_Chinese_lunisolar_calendar
Many thanks. :) Interesting fact is that is that the Chinese zodiac has the same number of signs as the Western/Greek zodiac. Could it be a coincidence or is it for the same reason (the number of constellations seen in the ecliptic) of the Greek zodiac? Although in the Greek zodiac all 12 signs are comprehended in each year, every year, but in the Chinese zodiac, it's one sign for each year.
Thorcsf said:
Thank you very much for the extensive explanation and your efforts to search/gather all that information. You've covered all of my queries and I think I've got the grasp of everything now, although it's a complicated calendar system. :P

There's only one thing that I didn't quite understand yet. By what I read there on Wikipedia, when a leap month is inserted, they apparently repeat one month in the year; but each month in the Chinese calendar has 29 or 30 days. A leap month can't be this long, right? It'd be too much to add in the year. What is the duration of a leap month exactly? I didn't see that information. Does it vary by year?
Yes, by "leap month", it really means inserting a whole extra month during that year. The effect can be seen from the table from the link Trit's mentioned above - if leap month exists during the current year, the next year's New Year's Day can be pushed back to as late as around mid Feb.

P.S. Don't forget a Chinese Calendar month has generally less day(s) than that of a Georgian Calendar month (except Feb), so the resulting effect won't be a whole Georgian Calendar month delay.
 
Long time no post. :) Made a simple decensoring for myself. Thought I'd share it. I'm not very good with drawing in Photoshop, so it's not great, but I think it's fine enough; better than censored, at least.
Thorcsf said:
Long time no post. :) Made a simple decensoring for myself. Thought I'd share it. I'm not very good with drawing in Photoshop, so it's not great, but I think it's fine enough; better than censored, at least.
Good job! Thank you.
xiaochuyun said:
Good job! Thank you.
You're welcome. :)