Danbooru-based image board with a specialization in high-quality images.
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cap hayate_no_gotoku sanzenin_nagi thighhighs

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Wait. How is this a screen cap at 1280x1845? Is it upscaled, or is it not actually a screen cap?
720P, stitch several frames up
it maybe upscaled in the process of airing, and there are compression artifacts not by jpeg.
don't know they should be tagged with those faults, but those stitched images can be few exception of caps not deleted.
Most videos have that hint of upscaled and block artifact, its part of the method of compression - remove what the human eye won't see. Normally you are seeing moving images, you don't have the time to notice these things.

Computers will automatically reduce a video to max screen dimensions, it can result in some odd resolutions. This laptop for example would produce a 1366x768 cap (pre-cropped). And remember, most TV signals are sent for screens of larger size than your usual monitor.
SciFi said:
And remember, most TV signals are sent for screens of larger size than your usual monitor.
The actual resolution of a TV is almost always smaller than that of your usual monitor, so anything meant to show on your TV will be on a smaller resolution than your monitor. The one exception would be Blu-rays with full 1080p. NTSC would be 720 x 480, with HDTV broadcasts being at 1280 x 720, and full HD from Blu-rays at 1920 x 1080. Except for small laptops, 1024 x 768 would be on the small side for a monitor. Most for a desktop these days would be at least 1280 x 1024 which exceeds the resolution for HDTV. The are plenty of laptops that have that kind of resolution as well. And there are some monitors which are large enough to show 1080p at full resolution (mine is 1920 x 1200).

Now, the TV itself is generally larger than a monitor, but the resolution isn't.
why is this picture in this pool - " yoiko no moecco " ?
Because someone stuck the photoshopped child in the Little Sister's pool.
Kalessin said:
The actual resolution of a TV is almost always smaller than that of your usual monitor, so anything meant to show on your TV will be on a smaller resolution than your monitor. The one exception would be Blu-rays with full 1080p. NTSC would be 720 x 480, with HDTV broadcasts being at 1280 x 720, and full HD from Blu-rays at 1920 x 1080. Except for small laptops, 1024 x 768 would be on the small side for a monitor. Most for a desktop these days would be at least 1280 x 1024 which exceeds the resolution for HDTV. The are plenty of laptops that have that kind of resolution as well. And there are some monitors which are large enough to show 1080p at full resolution (mine is 1920 x 1200).

Now, the TV itself is generally larger than a monitor, but the resolution isn't.
If you understand what SciFi said, you'd find that he is right...
(Four months ago, I didn't notice that...orz