Danbooru-based image board with a specialization in high-quality images.
clamp kinomoto_sakura monochrome scanning_resolution tsubasa_reservoir_chronicle

Edit | Respond

should be resized at 25% (from 1200dpi to 300dpi)
So what should we do? Make the picture smaller? At what size?
it's 1200dpi but not all of them..
inspect one by one is just a pain. I give up \(--)/
Sorry... If there's something I can help...
It was not me who scanned it, but I have this manga. I can try scanning if it's needed.
You can know the best pixel size if you know the print size.
If a book is A4 (artbook size), the scan should be 2000~4700px (3500px=300dpi recommended). if it were a telecard, it must be under 1350px (1020px=300dpi recommended)

In the basic of scan, set dpi at 600dpi while scanning, and resized down at 300dpi after scanning.
Huum... Can Photoshop resize on dpi measure? I only know of pixels and centimeters, but that's interesting. I shall try that out later on. Thank you deeply midzki!!! *saves text to computer*
Yes, open this image up in Photoshop, then go to Image > Image Size (alt +ctrl + i), and you'll see 1200 in the resolution box. For ordinary manga pages like this, 300dpi is best.

Sometimes jpeg processors spit things out that change the resolution number to 72 (suemura's images are like this), so you'll just have to estimate based on the paper size.
Oh, I see. Sorry for flooding the comments, feel free to PM if that's better.
But what's exactly the influence of dpi in pictures? 72 dpi means lower resolution, right?
But can the pictures be big and still have low dpi? Does dpi change the quality/sharpness of the lines?

Ok, 300 dpi, I'll remember that.
600 dpi should only be for bigger artbooks, right?
Ok, 300 dpi, I'll remember that.
600 dpi should only be for bigger artbooks, right?
600 is too big. 350-360 is the maximum for such, more would be pointless.
Debbie said:
72 dpi means lower resolution, right?
But can the pictures be big and still have low dpi? Does dpi change the quality/sharpness of the lines?

600 dpi should only be for bigger artbooks, right?
Not necessarily. It's hard for me to explain briefly, so I'll point you to Wikipedia's article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dots_per_inch . The second and third sections are relevant. Things get confusing sometimes because we use "resolution" and "dimension" here interchangeably. When something gets deleted for being "low res", it might have a low resolution, but it's more like the dimensions are small.

The metadata of post #89343 will tell you that the resolution is 72, but since we know the paper size, we can estimate that it has been scanned at a resolution of 1000dpi. post #81284 has about the same dimensions, but is actually 400dpi (because it's actually a ginormous poster).

There are some programs, like GIMP, that can modify the horizontal and vertical resolution numbers, without actually changing the dimensions of the image. If you resize a picture up or down, the sharpness can be affected by which resizing method you use (midzki knows more about this than I do).

600dpi is only for very high quality printing, with FM, not AM screening. Most of the time, that's doujinshi printing.

Most important:
higher dpi != better
This is why we have the scanning_resolution fault tag.
To be clear: if you don't know what you're doing, too high resolution is better than too low. Too big can be fixed, too small can't.
I'm planning to make a beginner's Q & A thread after the inline image fixed..

the point: If you aren't a pro, scan anything at 600dpi always, and ask a pro how to resize down.
Been trying to create a wiki on "need to know" about moe too, but couldn't quite figure out what information I'd like to put onto it.
aoie_emesai said:
Been trying to create a wiki on "need to know" about moe too, but couldn't quite figure out what information I'd like to put onto it.
I see you've got one essential point on there already.
van said:
I see you've got one essential point on there already.
I should probably change the title too :)
Could use this as an example.
van said:
Could use this as an example.
!

Heh.
van said:
Could use this as an example.
hahaha :)

Shuugo would be disappointed ^^
van said:
Could use this as an example.
It's a bit odd that they don't allow portrait orientated wallpapers?
Aurelia said:
There are some programs, like GIMP, that can modify the horizontal and vertical resolution numbers, without actually changing the dimensions of the image.
So, does that mean that GIMP changes the horizontal/vertical size of the picture, but doesn't change the DPI of the picture?
Does Photoshop make that as well?

If you resize a picture up or down, the sharpness can be affected by which resizing method you use (midzki knows more about this than I do).
And what do you think that is the best method? Or the generally used method? What you normally use for common mangas and artbooks.

midzki said:
I'm planning to make a beginner's Q & A thread after the inline image fixed..
aoie_emesai said:
Been trying to create a wiki on "need to know" about moe too, but couldn't quite figure out what information I'd like to put onto it.
I am a 100% beginner. I know nothing, or very little, about scanning and pictures quality, so maybe I can point out some basics that could be put on the "how to".
It's a very interesting, creative and useful idea, will probably give you experienced scanners lot of work. But I bet it will help a lot. I don't think I've seen a beginner guide like this before, anywhere.

If I can help on anything, to build this help thread, please PM, let's make this "how to" together!
Okay, since this is getting technical, let me make sure the terms are clear first.
resolution - I don't know how to say this well, so read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image_resolution (there's a Portuguese ver. too).
dimensions - the number of pixels horizontally, and vertically

Debbie said:
So, does that mean that GIMP changes the horizontal/vertical size of the picture, but doesn't change the DPI of the picture?
Does Photoshop make that as well?

And what do you think that is the best method? Or the generally used method? What you normally use for common mangas and artbooks.
http://img708.imageshack.us/img708/1210/resolution.png
Original on left, modified in PS in middle, modified in GIMP on right.

Both can change dimensions without affecting the resolution numbers. Modifying the number in PS also changes the dimensions (at least in CS3). GIMP can change the resolution without changing anything else. If I were to print the images out, 1 and 2 would be the same size, while 3 would be 3.33 times wider and 3.33 times taller.

I don't know what resizing method is best. I think midzki likes lanczos, but that's only in GIMP. I use...bicubic sharper? Whatever is the default.

I know there's somewhat of a language barrier between us, so I can really only point you toward different articles and tell you to mess around in PS or GIMP until you understand what they do.
Ok, then let me see.
Resolution is the quality overall and the detail the picture holds, and it can be measured with number of lines per milimeter, number of lines per inch... And dpi, dots per inch. In the computer, it would be pixels per inch.
dimensions - the number of pixels horizontally, and vertically
Got it!

Oh, PSD file has smaller dimensions. So in order to change the resolution to 300 dpi, you changed the dimensions as well?
You could make it into 300 dpi on GIMP without affecting the dimensions.

Oh really? Even having a smaller dimension, the PSD file would be the same print size as the original file?

Midzki uses lanczos, which is a method found in GIMP. And you use bicubic sharper, is it found on Photoshop CS3?
Yeah, sorry for all the trouble. Reading the English page was difficult, but as soon as I found the Portuguese link, wow, it got much easier.

If you have more links, and if it isn't much of a problem to you, then it's ok, please send!
I don't know what GIMP is like. Is it a heavy program? Is it free-to-use? Or don't I need it, only PS is ok?

Wow, I'm so impressed! Besides knowing so much about image properties, you and all the others here are very helpful, I don't know how to thank you! Your help was very important and useful, Aurelia. Now things are much clearer in my mind. Thankies!

spoiler
The lanczos resampling program of Gimp is crashed. Using Xnview instead.
with my experience,
FM screening: 400dpi
AM screening: 300dpi
Fabric (dakimakura): 200dpi or less
look good
Xnview... Hum... What's the difference of FM and AM?
While searching for the answer, I found this http://cias.rit.edu/~gravure/tt/pdf/cmw/TT3_Tiago.pdf
It's interesting that the name of the author is Tiago Costa, a VERY Brazilian name. Wow!